HPC or HCNA?

Sometimes, the Historic Cleveland Neighborhood Association (est. 2002) is confused with the City of Cleveland’s Historic Preservation Commission (est. 2004). The following is an explanation of the two separate, but complimentary entities:

City of Cleveland’s Historic Preservation Commission (HPC)

The HPC was established by the Cleveland City Council to develop historic preservation guidelines and its current district boundaries.  Having recognized that historic preservation is a major factor in communities and economic development across the country, the City recognized the importance of revitalizing and protecting the value of older residential areas as part of it’s fiscally responsible economic and tourism goals.

The City’s most notable remaining historic residential properties are located primarily north of the downtown commercial district.  Within this area are the National Register of Historic Places- Centenary Avenue District and Ocoee Street District.  HPC’s seven member commission is tasked with reviewing all certificate of approval (COA) plans and applications for construction, demolition, and alterations to structures within the historic preservation district. 

The boundaries for the City’s district are Highland Avenue to the west; Twenty-first Street to the north; the West side of Church Street to the East; 6th Street to the south.

Historic Cleveland Neighborhood Association (HCNA)

The HCNA is a 501(c) 3 neighborhood association with diverse mix of resident members and ages who appreciate “Cleveland’s First Neighborhood’s” collection of 19th and 20th Century homes with sidewalks and trees; desire the conveniences of an urban lifestyle; and want to know their neighbors. It is governed by a voluntary Board of Directors. 

In 2004, this association adopted a Master Neighborhood Plan with the goals of urban design, planning, code enforcement, education support, public works & safety, and parks & recreation. Historic preservation is an integral part of the neighborhood “planning and preservation of R-1 zoning” goals.

HCNA boundaries are more widespread and include 25th Street to the north; Central Avenue to the south;  Church Street to the east and Keith Street to the west.

Over 700 homes from 25th Street to Central Avenue and Church Street to Keith Street.

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ADDITIONAL PHOTO CREDITS

Jennie Kirkpatrick

Amy Banks

Candy Scoggins

Margot Still / Historic Library&Archives 

 

Over 700 homes from 25th Street to Central Avenue and Church Street to Keith Street.

HCNA

SOCIAL MEDIA

Coming Soon...

MEMBERSHIP

Addt'l. Photo Credits

Jennie Kirkpatrick

Amy Banks

Candy Scoggins

Margo Still / Historic  Library Branch

 

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